Sheldon Point, with its scenic trails, rocky cliffs and panoramic views of Saint John Harbour, is a popular stop for hikers on their way to the Irving Nature Park. Hiker Sandy Stewart-Giddings, who lives in Quispamsis, first stumbled across the stone carvings at Sheldon Point in 2018. “As I was walking along the trail, out of the corner of my eye, I saw this big gargoyle head,” Stewart-Giddings said. Some are elaborately carved with roses, lilies and sunflowers. There are delicately carved arches and bench-like slabs big enough to seat two people.    “I was so curious,” she said. “What is this all about? What is the history here? It was really intriguing.” The stones are “a piece of our glorious 19th-century Saint John history that has disappeared,” according to Saint Johner Keith Dow. The stones belonged to Customs House, one of the grandest buildings to emerge from the ashes of the Great Fire of 1877. Built by architects McKean and Fairweather at a cost of $160,000, it dominated the Saint John harbourfront between Prince William and Water streets. At a time when Saint John was still a major port, the staff at Customs House were ...