In its initial formulation it was equal parts brandy, lemon and Cointreau. Completely unpalatable to modern palates. With these initial bizarre proportions, and the fact that every bartender worth their salt knows of it, (but have likely never willingly drank one), the Sidecar finds itself in a unique position. Venerated but ignored. Joaquin Simo is the most famous contemporary bartender to proselytize and modernize the Sidecar. He recommends a Cognac, Pierre Ferrand 1840 specifically, increases it to 2 ounces, with ¾ ounce each of lemon and dry curacao. For balance, and “mouthfeel,” he adds a teaspoon of 2:1 demerara syrup. The syrup ensures the drink is not overly tart, as the curacao he uses, a Pierre Ferrand product as well, is quite dry. Brandy is, as I referenced in a previous article, one of those spirits that really can’t be futzed around with. Quality is necessary in a brandy, especially in a brandy forward cocktail. None of the well or entry-level products will do. Similarly, Cointreau, once an almost omnipresent ingredient in drinks has found itself shut out of the conversation due to, at least in Oregon, pricing. I began by pulling the brandy back to 1.5 ounces usin...