In 1990, regular production option ZR1 was a special performance package intended to transform a base Corvette sport coupe into the fastest production car that could be sold in the U.S., and it was nicknamed “King of the Hill.” Federal exhaust emission regulations started horsepower numbers falling in 1971, and when they bottomed out in 1975 the Corvette’s base 350 was left with 165 hp before slowly making a comeback, reaching 245 hp in 1989. But in 1990, power-hungry buyers had a choice. The ZR1 package included the 375hp LT5 which would reach 405 hp in 1993, all out of the same 350ci displacement. At the time, however, it was thought it took four camshafts, 16 fuel injectors, and 32 valves to stay within current federal emission standards while making this kind of power. Articles on the ZR1 started appearing in 1988 (anticipating a 1989 introduction), but when its launch was pushed back to 1990, instead of losing interest, power-starved horsepower junkies like us just got more excited, and for 10 years this author owned the 39th ZR1 ever built. Lotus in Hethel, England, was part of GM at the time, and they designed the LT5 based on their stillborn Etna 4.0-liter V8 architectur...